Aerial Photography
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Aerial Photography

Sadly, the very first examples of Aerial Photography no longer exist. They were taken over Paris in 1858 by French photographer and balloonist Gaspard-Félix Tournachon, best known by his pseudonym, Nadar. He is distinguished as the very first person to take aerial photographs and as a pioneer in the use of artificial lighting in photography. While none of his aerial photographs have survived, his contribution to photography is recognized with the Prix Nadar, a French photojournalism prize awarded in Nadar's name. My own efforts in Aerial Photography are guided by the strides made by Nadar and other forerunners in this branch of photography. I specialize in taking high-resolution aerial imagery of landscapes, events, equipment, buildings, and just about everything else my clients require a bird’s eye view of. The aerial photographs I take are applicable to the documentation of constructions sites; inspection of land and property; as well as architecture and urban planning. Aerial photographs are also very useful to researchers as they provide a wealth of information that could not possibly be fully contained in text. Aerial Photography is particularly useful when the area to be photographed is inaccessible on foot or when certain land features are simply impossible to view or comprehend from the ground. With my years of experience taking aerial photographs, I know when it is best to take oblique images (typically at around 45 degrees) and when to go for vertical shots. Of course, there are many instances in which both are needed to fully capture all the features of the landscape being photographed. The image above is an impressive example of the power of Aerial Photography and one I could not help but include in this portfolio. The expanse captured from foreground to horizon is mesmerizing, as is the amount of detail contained in just this one image. Amazing!